FIFA’s 289-page Technical Report on the 2010 World Cup – in 15 points

September 3, 2010


Iker Casillas
“This week, FIFA have unveiled their ‘technical report’ on the 2010 World Cup. Technical reports are, in FIFA’s words, ‘published after each and every FIFA competition in order to analyse how the game is progressing’. Some of the information is not particularly fascinating, an example being the revelation that ‘all successful teams have excellent strikers who arecapable of converting goalscoring opportunities that come their way’. Nevertheless, the document does identify some intriguing patterns, and offers a variety of interesting theories about the success, or otherwise, of the 32 teams competing in the tournament. Even the most ardent football fan would struggle to find the motivation to read all 289 pages of the document, so here’s 15 key quotes, and some comment.” (Zonal Marking)

Advertisements

Roberto Carlos wonder goal ‘no fluke’, say physicists

September 3, 2010

“Brazilian Roberto Carlos’s 1997 free-kick against France curved so sharply that it left goalkeeper Fabian Barthez standing still and looking puzzled. Now, a study published in the New Journal of Physics suggests that the long-held assumption that the goal was a fantastic fluke is wrong. A French team of scientists discovered the trajectory of the goal and developed an equation to describe it.” (BBC)


Hodgson’s men struggled through no fault of their own

September 3, 2010

“With Javier Mascherano refusing to play, a response to the Liverpool board rejecting a derisory bid from Spanish giants FC Barcelona, Roy Hodgson had a tactical headache. He had options to replace El Jefecito with youngster Jay Spearing or risk Christian Poulsen, who was recovering from his debut on Thursday. This would have resulted in Steven Gerrard playing in an advanced midfield role, something of a ‘hot topic’ among football-fans. However, Roy Hodgson opted for a 4-4-2 with Gerrard and Lucas in midfield with N’Gog and the now-fit Fernando Torres up-front.” (Talking about Football)


My Favourite Footballer…Michael Owen

September 3, 2010


Michael Owen
“I wasn’t a big fan of posters as a child. It didn’t help that my room was incredibly tiny with wall space was at a premium. Nevertheless, I made an exception for one player. Twice. A picture of a home-grown teenager in Liverpool red sat on my wall next to a horrific hand-drawn image in an England shirt. His eyes were the wrong colour and I had misjudged the lining up of his arms with the bottom half of his body, creating a valley on his shoulder where I had gone down then up to correct my mistake. However limited my artistic skills were, he was instantly recognisable by the number 20 on his chest.” (The Equaliser)


The Celtic and Rangers Issus

September 3, 2010

“You’ll have noticed that we haven’t yet looked to Scotland on IBWM. Today is the day and, invariably, we must start in Glasgow with Celtic and Rangers. Just this once. IBWM welcomes Tom Hall.” (In Bed with Maradona)


Champions League group draw thoughts (Group A-D)

September 3, 2010

“Europe’s premier footballing competition once again welcomed the officials of the elite clubs across the continent to the Grimaldi Forum, for what is quickly becoming the most comedic and most drawn out football draw ever . Even I would welcome Jim Rosenthal into the proceedings in an attempt to make it a little bit quicker than Ben Hur. The faux-drama of the event was astounding whilst the Inter players who won the club awards looked uninterested at the format. Meanwhile Gary Lineker was called upon to pick letters, a task he seemed utterly bemused by continually picking out Group C. Conspiracy? No of course not, just coincidence.” (6 Pointer), (Group E-H)


Blackburn 1-2 Arsenal Analysis

September 3, 2010

“There was a lot of talk before the match about how Arsenal would cope with Blackburn’s long ball and set piece-orientated style of football, particularly after comments made by both sets of managers. In the end it was fairly comfortable for the Gunners as they defended their box well and exposed Blackburn’s lack of possession retention.” (The Backwards Gooner)