Adam Hurrey’s Football Cliches is spiritual heir to best fanzines, Danny Baker and Danny Kelly’s shows

November 25, 2014

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“‘Diminutive, derisory, pulsating and profligate sit with almost absurd comfort in the footballing vernacular,’ notes author Adam Hurrey in the introduction to his delightful Football Clichés book, adding, ‘while I struggle to remember anyone using the word aplomb in any other context than a well-taken goal’. Thus begins a meticulously detailed dissection of the well-worn phrases with which players, managers, media and fans fight the losing battle of conveying football’s drama through mere words. This new hardback, published by Headline, is a forensic and thorough examination of football’s language.” Telegraph

amazon: Football Clichés by Adam Hurrey


Patience, Panic, or Liverpool: Sorting Through the Premier League’s Tortoise Race for Fourth Place

November 25, 2014

“How to fix a broken team? With the Premier League keeping things weird for another weekend, that’s the question lingering above many clubs. As it stands, Manchester United and Newcastle are tied for fourth place on 19 points, narrow leaders in a seven-team pack all within a measly two points of the ultra-valuable final Champions League spot. And that doesn’t even include Liverpool, who sit in 12th, just barely eclipsing a one-point-per-game pace.” Grantland


Analysis: Zaza and Immobile Central to Conte’s New Breed

November 25, 2014

“It wasn’t so long ago that things looked rather bleak for Italy. Following a group stage exit from the 2014 World Cup, the Azzurri found themselves a team divided. In their final match of the tournament, a 1-0 loss to Uruguay under the oppressive Brazilian sun, Mario Balotelli again courted controversy. In the first half he produced a largely transparent performance from a footballing perspective, and after putting in a reckless challenge on Alvaro Pereira due to his increasing frustration, a number of observers felt that he was lucky to remain on the pitch.” Licence to Roam


David Moyes: Real Sociedad boss plays second to Messi on debut

November 25, 2014

“David Moyes kicked off his Spanish managerial career by guiding Real Sociedad to a 0-0 draw at struggling Deportivo La Coruna on Saturday night. Although the game itself was unremarkable, especially during a flat second half, it was still a highly eventful debut day for the former Preston, Everton and Manchester United boss, featuring a diverted aeroplane, a series of selection decisions, a bizarre touchline bust-up and a midnight finish. So how did he fare?” BBC


Borussia Dortmund’s Tactical Options: midfield diamond, asymmetrical 4-3-2-1, and more

November 25, 2014

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“Borussia Dortmund picked up their first points since September in when Jürgen Klopp’s team beat Borussia Mönchengladbach, thanks to Christoph Kramer and his ridiculous own goal. However, the struggling German powerhouse won just a battle, and it will be a long way to obtain the spot in the table they would’ve targeted when the Bundesliga season started. On the other hand, Dortmund’s roster depth promises interesting systems and approaches.” Outside of the Boot


Tactical Analysis | Arsenal 1-2 Manchester United: Wasteful Arsenal fail against United once again

November 25, 2014

“The rivalry between the 2 sides is not the same as it was in the mid-noughties when flying food and tunnel skirmishes dominated the back pages long after the battle took place on the pitch. The rivalry may have toned down since but coming on the back of the international break, both sides were looking for a much needed win to move up the table. Injuries have had a big part to play in both sides’ campaigns and defensive frailties for the teams meant fans and neutrals alike were expecting a game high on entertainment if not quality.” Outside of the Boot


David Alaba: The most modern player in the world

November 25, 2014

“In the modern game, versatility is an increasingly important quality. Players are asked to play in different positions, different roles and different systems. While times of the past have often called for this too, we are witness to the proper development of what some call ‘the universal player’, a player who has the ability to do most things required on a football pitch in a fashion that would be beneficial to both his team and himself. In Pep Confidential, the inside story of Pep Guardiola’s first season at Bayern München, the former Barcelona manager outlined his preference on how he would have a squad built. The Spaniard, in an ideal scenario, would want no more than 20 players but would want each of those 20 players to have the ability to play in two or three positions.” Outside of the Boot


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