Summer holiday

July 21, 2010


Bacchanal the Andrians, Nicolas Poussin
Football Further will be on holiday until the middle of August, during which time the site will be under-going what the French call ‘un relooking’, so apologies in advance if any visitors during that period find the blog looking like the cyber equivalent of a building site.” (Football Further)


Ready for its close-up? Bundesliga in good position to raise profile

July 21, 2010

“One prominent player agent in the Bundesliga has bought the domain mediocritysucks.de. He also loves sending out provocative letters with famous quotes from varied people — Karl Marx, Confucius and Lukas Podolski have all been featured in the past. His latest missive came this week, in a letter with a big “Steven Gerrard for England” sticker, and it carried a good line at the back of the envelope: ‘We don’t fear the competition, we are the competition.’” (SI)


The curious reluctance to love the Spanish: Part 1, Barca

July 21, 2010

“A debate is raging on the excellent Minus the Shooting regarding the dissatisfaction wrought by Spain’s performance at the World Cup so far. A lot of really interesting points are being made about the cognitive dissonance of the media’s framing of Spain and the difficulty to be excited by the virtuosity inherent in their performances.” (Vieira’s Weary One)


Soccer Empire: The World Cup and the Future of France

July 21, 2010


“It’s easy to be cynical about a book written by an American history professor which starts out describing the events of July 9, 2006. Oh shit, you think to yourself, it’s John Doyle with a doctorate; another football outsider thinking his fresh set of eyes can derive some deeper social meaning from ‘The Beautiful Game’ which the rest of us have somehow missed all these years. And there’s going to be more drivel about the head-butt. I mean, please. Spare us.” (Pitch Invasion)


Football Paves the Way to Masculinity Without Violence

July 21, 2010

“It’s Friday night, and in a ‘favela’ (shanty town) in this Brazilian city, a group of men relax with a beer after a hard week, while a song can be heard above the rowdy chatter. The lyrics, set to a samba rhythm, are about typical topics like football and women, but also about gender violence. They mingle with the smoke from an ‘asado,’ where meat is roasting over a makeshift grill on the pavement. This is Santa Marta, a favela in the south of Rio de Janeiro.” (IPS)


The Question: Is the World Cup too big?

July 21, 2010

“I wasn’t quite as down on this World Cup as most people seem to have been, but these things are relative. I’d place it high above 2002 and just above 2006, but behind every other tournament in my lifetime, and I don’t think that’s just down to the weariness of age. For once, in fact, I seem largely to agree with what Sean Ingle says in this piece.” (Guardian)


US World Cup Cycle Report Cards: Midfielders Edition

July 21, 2010


Michael Bradley
“This is the second of a four-part Series of Report Cards for the U.S. Men’s National Team’s Four Year World Cup Cycle, 2007-2010. While we are not issuing grades for all 92 players capped by Bob Bradley during the cycle, we will feature players not on the World Cup roster who figured prominently in the run-up to the 2010 World Cup. We will issue grades of A-F, rather than player-rankings style grades of 1-10. This edition is likely the longest, focusing on the American midfielders.” (Yanks are coming)


Demons From World Cup Follow Capello

July 21, 2010

“The World Cup has gone, but the embarrassment lingers for England and its Italian coach, Fabio Capello. The coach and his legal advisers are seeking to distance him from an online rating of players’ performances that bears his name. The Web site, the Capello Index, published last week, does not list one English player among the top 70 at the World Cup after the country was beaten 4-1 by Germany in the first knockout stage.” (NYT)


Bhoys are back

July 21, 2010

“Celtic Football Club played its first game on ‘an unusually cold evening in late May of 1888,’’ according to ‘Celtic: A Complete Record 1888-1992.’’ Celtic defeated Rangers, 5-2, beginning a rivalry that transcends sport, kicking off the history of one of the most widely-followed clubs in the world.” (Boston)


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